Angophora is an eucalypt. Here are some things about it that make it a really cool plant:

 

Its name

A combination of the Greek words angeion meaning goblet and phoreo meaning to carry because of its cup-shaped fruit

 

 

Its alien-like Lignotuber

The root crown swells to form a lignotuber that ensures it will survive fires etc.Chock full of carbs, the alien can make buds and helps the plant resprout! Hack at all its greenery and this eucalypt still comes out swinging.

 

Epicormic Buds i.e. "I Survive Fires - the sequel"

Formed within the bark, these buds catch the ball, if the alien drops it! They also make recovery possible, in case of intense winters. Cracked.com calls eucalypt behavior as napalming their enemies.

 

As trees, eucalypts are pretty amazing:

Some eucalyptus trees give Botany Bay kino, a resin used to protect ships against worms and other animals that make holes in their hulls. - See more at: http://www.houseandhome.org/tag/interesting-facts-about-eucalyptus-trees/#sthash.jZohP440.dpuf
Some eucalyptus trees give Botany Bay kino, a resin used to protect ships against worms and other animals that make holes in their hulls. - See more at: http://www.houseandhome.org/tag/interesting-facts-about-eucalyptus-trees/#sthash.jZohP440.dpuf

 

A resin, Botany Bay Kino, given by a species of eucalypts can actually protect ships from animals that bore holes in them!

 

 

The Blue Mountains, Australia, are enveloped in a blue haze thought to be because of the aromatic volatile oil that evaporate from the eucalyptus trees!
 

 

Some eucalyptus trees give Botany Bay kino, a resin used to protect ships against worms and other animals that make holes in their hulls. - See more at: http://www.houseandhome.org/tag/interesting-facts-about-eucalyptus-trees/#sthash.uZW7Skcc.dpuf

Insect larvae like to move inside the trunk and their paths form scribbly patterns on the surface.

 

 

And then there is the Rainbow Eucalypt

 

 

For other fun facts on eucalypts, go here!

Source: http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/potd/2015/08/angophora-subvelutina.php